Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Jurassic Park: Second cycle

Jurassic Park arrival on Isla Nublar

Jurassic Park's First Cycle leaves no doubt about it: something fishy lizardly is going on in Costa Rica. Now that the plot of the book is set in motion, Crichton introduces some characters.

Thursday, August 27, 2015

The Lost World: Jurassic Park

The Lost World by Steven Spielberg
Mommy's very angry
Last night I watched The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) by Steven Spielberg. The dino disaster sequel is based loosely on Michael Crichton's The Lost World - which Spielberg himself urged Crichton to write - and returns Jeff Goldblum as Dr. Ian Malcolm, everyone's favorite chaotician, on a brand new island with supposedly extinct dinosaurs. The Lost World is often swept under the rug, but I have to admit that I always had a soft spot for it and that, while it's obviously not as good as the original, it's still very much a wortwhile sequel. It's shocking to me how much hate #TLW has gotten over the years, especially since its dark tone and fast-paced action rank it head and shoulders above JP3 (although the battle between The Lost World and Jurassic Park 3 remains a hot topic among JP fans).

Monday, August 24, 2015

"Whatever happens, don't wait for me!"

The Lost World by Michael Crichton
Too much change is as destructive is too little
Yesterday I finished reading The Lost World (1995) by Michael Crichton. After Jurassic Park became a global phenomenon in 1993, director Steven Spielberg and hordes of JP fans urged Crichton to pen a sequel. Having never written one, he declined at first, but in the end he wavered, letting it loose on the world within two years. As soon as the book was published, Spielberg started pre-production for The Lost World: Jurassic Park, using Crichton's source material loosely to craft another wortwhile dino movie. Since I'm currently rediscovering in a glorious way my love for the Jurassic Park franchise, I decided to at last check out the book sequel. JP is truly the gift that keeps on giving ...

Monday, August 17, 2015

"This spot and this family are mine"

Raptor Red by Robert T. Bakker

This weekend I read Raptor Red (1995) by Amercian paleontologist Robert T. Bakker. Since I'm going through a Jurassic Park phase, I'm trying to get my hands on every worthwhile dino book out there, with Bakker's Velociraptor adventure a great start according to many lists. As you may or may not know, Bakker served as a consultant to Steven Spielberg when he was working on Jurassic Park, ensuring that the movie's dinosaurs exhibited scientifically accurate behavior. Spielberg, however, used dramatic license when it came to some aspects, modeling his famous Velociraptor after the Deinonychus (a raptor subspecies) and making it much bigger. 

Saturday, August 15, 2015

Jurassic Park: First cycle

The Lost World - Tina - beach - compy
"I found something!"
After the Introduction and the Prologue, Michael Crichton's Jurassic Park naturally flows in the book's First Cycle, which consists of five chapters and further setting the stage for the rest of the book. Let's recap.

Tuesday, August 11, 2015

What the Doctor ordered ...

Dr. Dre - Compton (a soundtrack by Dr. Dre)
Straight Outta Compton
*Ron Burgundy voice*

I interrupt Dino Month to bring your attention to Dr. Dre's latest album.

Monday, August 10, 2015

Jurassic Park III

Jurassic Park 3 (2001)

This weekend I rewatched Jurassic Park III (2001). Seeing how I'm in the middle of an epic Jurassic Park tear, it seemed only fitting to revisit all the movies. Sure, JPIII is my least favorite installment of the franchise, but it does A) mark the glorious return of Sam Neil as the awesome Dr. Alan Grant, B) introduce a new superpredator in the Spinosaurus, and C) have the terrifying aviary scene with the Pterodactyls. JPIII is the first movie in the franchise not to have been directed by Steven Spielberg, nor based on a book by Michael Crichton. It does, however, take some scenes from Crichton's Jurassic Park.

Sunday, August 9, 2015

"God bless all we leave behind us, and send us safely back"

The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

I just finished reading The Lost World (1912) by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle aka the father of Sherlock Holmes and the crime fiction genre. In The Cult of 'Jurassic Park', in which Grantland writer Bryan Curtis studies the Jurassic Park subculture, it is stated that JP is basically a reboot of Doyle's book, which, of course, immediately sparked my curiosity. Fuelled by the release of Jurassic World in June, the child in me is trying to piece together the franchise puzzle, and I figured that The Lost World was a proper place to start.
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